Appendixes



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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel Appendixes

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel This page intentionally left blank.

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel A Committee and Staff Biographies LINDA HAWES CLEVER, M.D., M.A.C.P., is founding Chair of the Department of Occupational Health at California Pacific Medical Center. She received undergraduate and medical degrees from Stanford University, undertook further training at Stanford and the University of California, San Francisco, and is board certified in internal medicine and occupational medicine. She is a member of the Western Association of Physicians and is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Her areas of special interest include personal, professional, and organizational renewal; current issues in health care, including managed care and ethics; the interactions of life, work, and health; the occupational health of women and health care workers; and leadership. She has been active in a variety of health, science, education, and public service endeavors. Editor of Western Journal of Medicine from 1990 to 1998, Dr. Clever currently serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. She also chairs the Policy Advisory Council of the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley, and the National Advisory Panel of the Institute for Women and Gender at Stanford. Dr. Clever is a member of the Institute of Medicine. RUTH HANFT, Ph.D., is an Independent Consultant who gained a Ph.D. from the George Washington University, specializing in health services administration and public finance. Dr. Hanft is a former U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health Research, Statistics, and Technology, and, more recently professor at the

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel George Washington University Department of Health Services Management and Policy. Dr. Hanft has led a team of consultants that assessed the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota, assisted the University of Kansas Masters of Public Health program in its development and preparation for accreditation, and served as a consultant to the Governor of Kansas’s Public Health Improvement Commission. Dr. Hanft was also a senior research associate at the Association of Academic Health Centers and served as an adjunct professor in the Department of Community Medicine at Dartmouth University’s Medical School. She has won the Walter Patenge Medal of Public Service, awarded by Michigan State University, and was awarded a fellowship by the Hastings Center. She is an associate editor for the International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care. Dr. Hanft served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Strategies for Supporting Graduate Medical Training in Primary Care, the Committee on Assessing Research Capabilities in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the Committee for the Study of Resources for Clinical Investigation. She has been a member of the Institute of Medicine for 21 years. RONALD KUTSCHER was with the Bureau of Labor Statistics for 39 years and served as Associate Commissioner from 1979 to 1996 where he directed the Office of Economic Growth and Employment Projections. That office was responsible for developing medium-term economic and employment projections of the U.S. economy and for preparing the Occupational Outlook Handbook. Mr. Kutscher has extensive international experience, especially in Europe and Asia, where he assisted governments in developing methods for preparing economic projections and assisted them with employment issues, particularly in countries making conversions to market economies. He has published over 50 papers dealing with economic and employment issues. Mr. Kutscher is a currently a fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the Presidential Rank Award in the Senior Executive Service in 1990. Mr. Kutscher received a B.A. in economics from Doane College in Nebraska and has completed graduate studies in economics, statistics, and econometrics at the University of Illinois and at universities in Washington, D.C. He previously served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Adequacy of Nurse Staffing. JAMES A. MERCHANT, M.D., is Dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa. Dr. Merchant joined the University of Iowa’s faculty as a professor, with an academic appointment in preventive medicine in 1981 and an appointment in internal medicine in 1982. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Iowa in 1966 and completed an internship and an internal medicine residency at Cleveland Metropolitan

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel General Hospital, followed by a fellowship in pulmonary and environmental medicine at Duke University. In 1973 he received a doctorate in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Trudeau Fellowship from the American Thoracic Society. His research interests focus on the epidemiology of pulmonary disease, environmental and occupational health, rural health care delivery, agricultural diseases and injuries, international health, and public and rural health policy. He has received numerous grants from National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and private foundations and corporations. Dr. Merchant currently chairs the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and serves on the National Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health for the U.S. Departments of Labor and Health and Human Services. Among his awards and honors are a commendation medal from the U.S. Public Health Service and a Health Policy Fellowship with the U.S. Senate. JAMES A. OPPOLD, Ph.D., C.S.P., is an environmental and occupational safety and health consultant, an adjunct professor at East Carolina University, and Chair of the Related Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. He has been a member of the Educational Standards Committee of the American Society of Safety Engineers, a professional/educational standards committee, for 14 years. He holds a doctorate in environmental engineering from the University of Florida as well as a master’s degree in radiation biophysics from the University of Kansas. Dr. Oppold previously directed the Occupational Health and Safety Program for the state of North Carolina, served as Director of the Division of Safety Research for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health at Morgantown, West Virginia, and supervised the radiological health, industrial hygiene, and the safety programs for the Tennessee Valley Authority. Among his consulting clients are the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the World Bank, and the Organization of American States. M.E. BONNIE ROGERS, Dr.P.H., R.N., F.A.A.N., is an Associate Professor of Nursing and Public Health and Director of the Occupational Health Nursing Program at the University of North Carolina, School of Public Health, Chapel Hill. Dr. Rogers received her nursing degrees from the Washington Hospital Center School of Nursing in Washington, D.C.; and from George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. Her master of public health degree and doctor of public health are from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Rogers is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, and the American Associa-

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel tion of Occupational Health Nurses. She has several funded research grants on clinical issues in occupational health, research priorities, hazards to health care workers, and ethics. She was a visiting scholar at the Hastings Center in Garrison, New York where she studied ethics and was granted a NIOSH career award to study ethical issues in occupational health. Dr. Rogers has also practiced for many years as a public health nurse, occupational health nurse, and occupational health nurse practitioner. She has published more than 90 articles and book chapters and two books, Occupational Health Nursing Concepts and Practice, the only text in the field, and Occupational Health Nursing Guidelines for Primary Clinical Conditions. Dr. Rogers serves on numerous editorial boards, is the chairperson of the National Occupational Research Agenda Liaison Committee, and was recently appointed to the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. SCOTT SCHNEIDER, M.S.I.H., C.I.H., is currently Director of Occupational Health and Safety of the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America, a joint labor management fund affiliated with the Laborers International Union of North America. He was awarded an M.S. in zoology from the University of Michigan in 1973 and an M.S. in industrial hygiene from the University of Pittsburgh in 1980. Mr. Schneider is a Certified Industrial Hygienist, and was Director of the Ergonomics Program at the Center to Protect Workers’ Rights, the research arm of the Building Trades department of the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations. Mr. Schneider is the author of over twenty scholarly works, including chapters in major occupational health and safety reference textbooks, handbooks, and encyclopedias. Mr. Schneider has conducted research for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in areas such as the ergonomics problems of construction workers, construction health hazards, health hazards in an iron foundry, and hearing loss in carpenters and jointers. Among the professional organizations that he belongs to are the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. MARTIN SEPULVEDA, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.O.E.M., is the Vice President of Global Occupational Health Services for the International Business Machines Corporation. Dr. Sepulveda is a graduate of Yale University and the Harvard University Medical School. He completed residencies in internal medicine at the University of California-San Francisco Hospitals and Clinics, and in occupational medicine at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He also completed an advanced fellowship in internal medicine at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel and served as a clinical research investigator at the Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is board certified and holds the rank of Fellow in both the American College of Physicians (internal medicine) and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (occupational medicine). Dr. Sepulveda has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and holds extramural appointments on scientific advisory boards, professional associations, and scientific journal review panels. ROBERT C. SPEAR, Ph.D., is a Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He received an M.S. in mechanical engineering in 1963 from the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. in control engineering from Cambridge University in Cambridge, England, 5 years later. Dr. Spear’s research interests relate principally to the assessment and control of exposures to hazardous agents in both the occupational and community environments. He has an extensive publication record in this field which spans farmworkers’ exposures to pesticides to strategies for the characterization and control of the exposure of rural populations to parasites in the developing world. He was appointed founding Director of the University of California’s Center for Occupational and Environmental Health in 1979 and continues to serve in that capacity. He has served on numerous committees advisory to governmental agencies including the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health and, currently, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Board of Scientific Counselors. LOIS E. TETRICK, Ph.D., is Professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology at the University of Houston. Dr. Tetrick is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology and is on the editorial boards of Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, and Advanced Topics in Organizational Behavior. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Before joining the faculty at the University of Houston in 1995, she was on the faculty at Wayne State University for 12 years, where she was the primary mentor of the post-doctoral fellow in occupational health psychology that was funded by the American Psychological Association and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. She has conducted research on individuals’ perceptions of the employment relationship, employees’ commitment to their employers and to their unions, factors associated with occupational stress, and perceptions of the safety climate at work. Profes-

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel sor Tetrick received her doctorate in industrial/organizational psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1983. NEAL A. VANSELOW, M.D., is Chancellor-emeritus and Professor-emeritus of Medicine at Tulane University Medical Center. He also holds an appointment as Adjunct Professor of Health Systems Management in the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He served as Chancellor of Tulane University Medical Center from 1989 to 1994 and as a Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine during the 1994 to 1995 academic year. He has served as Chairman of the Department of Post-graduate Medicine and Health Professions Education at the University of Michigan, Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, and Vice President for Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota. He is an allergist who received his training in internal medicine and allergy/immunology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Vanselow has served as chairperson of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) and chairperson of the Board of Directors, Association of Academic Health Centers. He has been a member of the Institute of Medicine since 1989 and chaired the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Future of Primary Care. He also served as cochair of the Institute of Medicine Committee on the U.S. Physician Supply. He currently serves as a member of the Pew Health Professions Commission and is on the Board of Trustees of Meharry Medical College. His areas of particular interest include the health care workforce and graduate medical education. M. DONALD WHORTON, M.D., M.P.H., is an occupational medicine physician certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and the American College of Epidemiology. Dr. Whorton started his own medical consulting firm, Whorton and Associates, in July 1994. He began his consulting career in 1978 as a Principal and Senior Occupational Physician and Epidemiologist at Environmental Health Associates and remained as the Chief Medical Scientist and a Vice President of ENSR Consulting and Engineering after its purchase in 1988. Dr. Whorton is internationally known for his work on the effects of the nematocide DBCP on the testes of exposed workers and other studies on reproductive effects from workplace exposures. He has authored or co-authored numerous scientific and policy-related articles in professional journals. Dr. Whorton was formerly on the staff of the University of California in Berkeley. A member of many professional organizations, he is a past officer of the American Public Health Association and member of the editorial board of the American Journal of Public Health and a past member of the National Institute for Occupa-

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Safe Work in the 21st Century: Education and Training Needs for the Next Decade’s Occupational Safety and Health Personnel tional Safety and Health Research Grant Review Study Section. Dr. Whorton is the current chairperson of the University of California Statewide Advisory Committee for Occupational Health Centers. Dr. Whorton is also a member of the Institute of Medicine. IOM STUDY STAFF FREDERICK J. MANNING, Ph.D., is a Senior Program officer in the Institute of Medicine’s Division of Health Sciences Policy Division and Study Director. In 6 years at Institute of Medicine, he has served as Study Director for projects addressing a variety of topics including medical isotopes, potential hepatitis drugs, blood safety and availability, rheumatic disease, resource sharing in biomedical research, and chemical and biological terrorism. Before joining IOM, Dr. Manning spent 25 years in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command, serving in positions that included Director of Neuropsychiatry at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and Chief Research Psychologist for the Army Medical Department. Dr. Manning earned his Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard University in 1970, following undergraduate education at the College of the Holy Cross. ALDEN B. CHANG II is a project assistant in the Division of Health Sciences Policy. He has been with the Institute of Medicine since February 1999 and has also worked on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation: Assessing Current Policies and the Potential Impact of the DHHS Final Rule study and the Forum on Emerging Infections. Alden earned his bachelor of arts degree in international relations from The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.