Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

ROBERT T. MICHAEL (Chair) is the Eliakim Hastings Moore Distinguished Service professor in the Harris School at the University of Chicago. He was founding dean of the Harris School and served as director of the National Opinion Research Center from 1984 through 1989. Previously, he taught in the education department at the University of Chicago and in the economics departments at Stanford University and the University of California at Los Angeles. His research interests are in the economics of the family, including studies of marriage and divorce, the allocation of income within the family, parental investments in children, and adult sexual behavior. He has conducted several national surveys of behavior pertaining to children, schooling, and partnering. At the National Research Council, he chaired the Panel on Pay Equity, and he serves on the Board on Children and Families of the National Research Council/Institute of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a B.A. degree from Ohio Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Columbia University.

ANTHONY B. ATKINSON is warden of Nuffield College, Oxford. Previously he was professor of political economy at the University of Cambridge and professor of economics at the London School of Economics. His research is in the field of public economics and income distribution. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Cambridge. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society (president, 1988), a fellow of the British Academy, and an honorary member of the American Economic Association. He also served as president of the International Economic Association. He is joint editor of the Journal of Public Economics.



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Measuring Poverty: A New Approach Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff ROBERT T. MICHAEL (Chair) is the Eliakim Hastings Moore Distinguished Service professor in the Harris School at the University of Chicago. He was founding dean of the Harris School and served as director of the National Opinion Research Center from 1984 through 1989. Previously, he taught in the education department at the University of Chicago and in the economics departments at Stanford University and the University of California at Los Angeles. His research interests are in the economics of the family, including studies of marriage and divorce, the allocation of income within the family, parental investments in children, and adult sexual behavior. He has conducted several national surveys of behavior pertaining to children, schooling, and partnering. At the National Research Council, he chaired the Panel on Pay Equity, and he serves on the Board on Children and Families of the National Research Council/Institute of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a B.A. degree from Ohio Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Columbia University. ANTHONY B. ATKINSON is warden of Nuffield College, Oxford. Previously he was professor of political economy at the University of Cambridge and professor of economics at the London School of Economics. His research is in the field of public economics and income distribution. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Cambridge. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society (president, 1988), a fellow of the British Academy, and an honorary member of the American Economic Association. He also served as president of the International Economic Association. He is joint editor of the Journal of Public Economics.

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Measuring Poverty: A New Approach DAVID M. BETSON is the director of the Hesburgh Program in Public Service and an associate professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame. He was previously a research associate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a staff economist at the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. His research has dealt with the impact of tax and transfer programs on the economy and the distribution of income. At the National Research Council he served on the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs of the Committee on National Statistics. He received a B.A. degree from Kalamazoo College and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. REBECCA M. BLANK is a professor of economics at Northwestern University and a faculty research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is also a member of the research faculty at Northwestern University's Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research, and she serves as codirector of its Urban Poverty Program, an interdisciplinary research and graduate training program. Prior to coming to Northwestern, she taught at Princeton University and served as a senior staff economist with the Council of Economic Advisers. Her research focuses on the interaction among the economy, government antipoverty programs, and the behavior and well-being of low-income families. She recently received the David Kershaw award, given biannually to the young scholar whose work has had the most impact on policy. She has a B.S. degree from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. LAWRENCE D. BOBO is professor of sociology and director of the Center for Research on Race, Politics, and Society at University of California at Los Angeles. His research interests include racial attitudes and relations, social psychology, public opinion, and political behavior. He has served on the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey of the National Opinion Research Center, and he has been active in the work of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. At the National Research Council, he served as a senior research associate for the Committee on the Status of Black Americans. He has served on the editorial boards of Public Opinion Quarterly and Social Psychology Quarterly and is currently on the editorial board of the American Sociological Review. He is coauthor of the award-winning book Racial Attitudes in America (Harvard University Press). He received a B.A. degree from Loyola Marymount University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. JEANNE BROOKS-GUNN is Virginia and Leonard Marx professor in child development and professor of pediatrics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University. She also directs the Center for Young Chil-

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Measuring Poverty: A New Approach dren and Families at Teachers College and the Adolescent Study Program at Teachers College and the St. Luke-Roosevelt Hospital Center of Columbia University. A developmental psychologist, she received an Ed.M. degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Her specialty is policy-oriented research focusing on familial influences on children's development—achievement, psychological well-being, school and behavioral problems—and intervention efforts aimed at ameliorating the developmental delays seen in poor and at-risk children. CONSTANCE F. CITRO (Study Director) is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation (NSF) research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the Committee on National Statistics, she has served or is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Retirement Income Modeling, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the usefulness and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income measurement and demographic change. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. JOHN F. COGAN is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and teaches in the Public Policy Program at Stanford University. Previously, he was an associate economist at the Rand Corporation. He has spent considerable time in pubic service beginning in 1981: as assistant secretary for policy in the U.S. Department of Labor and, subsequently, as associate director for economics and government, associate director for human resources, and deputy director at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. He also served as a member of the U.S. Bipartisan Commission on Comprehensive Health Care (Pepper Commission) and the Social Security "Notch" Commission. He is now pursuing research in the areas of the U.S. budget and fiscal policy, income distribution, and the role of the congressional budget process and its impact on fiscal policy. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of California at Los Angeles. SHELDON H. DANZIGER is professor of social work and public policy, faculty associate in population studies, and director of the Research and Training Program on Poverty, the Underclass, and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. He received a B.A. degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Measuring Poverty: A New Approach He was previously on the faculty of the School of Social Work and the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, and he was director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. His research focuses on trends in poverty and inequality and the effects of economic and demographic changes and government social programs on disadvantaged groups. He is the coeditor of several volumes, most recently Confronting Poverty: Prescriptions for Change (Harvard University Press, 1994). He was a member of the Committee on Research on the Urban Underclass, Social Science Research Council; the Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy, National Research Council; and the Panel on Employment, Income and Occupations, Committee on the Status of Black Americans, National Research Council. ANGUS S. DEATON is William Church Osborn professor of public affairs and professor of economics and international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University. He has previously held appointments at the University of Bristol and Cambridge University in England. He has been a long-time consultant for the World Bank, working on transportation, welfare measurement, price reform, and saving. He is author or coauthor of three books and many journal articles on demand analysis, theoretical and applied econometrics, saving, public finance, and development. His most recent work is on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of saving behavior and on the many issues surrounding the behavior of the prices of primary commodities. In 1978 he was the first recipient of the Frisch Medal of the Econometric Society. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and was editor of Econometrica , and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. At the National Research Council, he has served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics. JUDITH M. GUERON is president of the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), a nonprofit research organization whose mission is to design and evaluate promising education and employment-related programs aimed at improving the well-being of disadvantaged adults and youth. MDRC has studied more than three dozen, mostly large-scale social policy initiatives; its agenda includes demonstrations or evaluations of school-to-work educational initiatives, teen parent interventions, and efforts to improve child support enforcement and reduce child poverty. The author of many publications, including (with Edward Pauly) From Welfare to Work (Russell Sage Foundation, 1991), she also frequently testifies and speaks on the results and implications of MDRC's research, as well as on welfare reform and social policy more broadly. She has served on advisory panels to the U.S. Department of Labor, and she has served on several study committees at the National Research Council. She received a B.A. degree from Radcliffe College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University.

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Measuring Poverty: A New Approach ROBERT M. HAUSER is Vilas research professor of sociology and formerly served as director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has been on the faculty since 1969. He has also held a faculty appointment at Brown University and visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study in Vienna and at the University of Bergen. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. His publications related to education and social inequality include five books and numerous articles. His current research interests include trends in educational progression and social mobility in the United States among racial and ethnic groups, the effects of families on social and economic inequality, and changes in socioeconomic standing, health, and well-being across the life course. He has won the Paul F. Lazarsfeld award in research methods from the American Sociological Association, and he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. At the National Research Council, he currently serves on the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and on the Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. NANCY L. MARITATO served as a research associate with the Committee on National Statistics for this and other studies and is now working as an economist in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She received B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin, where she is currently working on a Ph.D. degree in economics. She was previously a research assistant at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a junior staff economist with the President's Council of Economic Advisers. Her interests lie in poverty and welfare policy analysis. ELAINE REARDON served as a research associate for the panel. She recently received a Ph.D. degree from the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. She is now at the Milken Institute for Job and Capital Formation, where her research topics include demand-side factors in black economic progress since 1940; dual-earner households and risk; and the determinants of and policies regarding self-employment. FRANKLIN D. WILSON is professor of sociology and Afro-American studies and director of the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has taught since 1973. He spent the 1991-1992 academic year in residence at the Bureau of the Census as an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation/Census Bureau fellow.

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Measuring Poverty: A New Approach He received a B.A. degree from Miles College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington State University. As a demographer, he specializes in population distribution and redistribution. His written work has covered such topics as internal migration and urbanization, residential differentiation and geographic mobility within metropolitan areas, and ethnic differences in social and economic well-being. He is currently coprincipal investigator of a project to study the labor market experiences of ethnic populations since 1983, using the 1984 through 1987 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation.